The Best Nonfiction and Fiction Books I Read in 2021

Joe Forrest
14 min readDec 30, 2021

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A lot of people often ask how I manage to read so much.

Admittedly, I probably do read faster than the average person, but that’s only because I’ve been reading voraciously for most of my life. (And the goal should never be to speed through as many books as possible).

The main reason I’m able to read so much is that I make time for reading. And that’s a lot easier than you think.

The average person spends about two hours on social media a day. Ask yourself: When’s the last time scrolling through your social media feeds left you feeling less anxious or more fulfilled with your life? Probably never, right?

When it comes to free time, you have control of how you use it. Therefore, if you want to read more, you should make time for it. If you want to spend more time on social media, that’s what you’ll end up doing.

Another great way to read more is to listen to audiobooks (yes, they count) while driving, exercising, or doing work around the house. Apps like Libby connect to your local library and let you rent audiobooks and Kindle books for free.

Anyway, I read about 90 books this year, and of those books, I’ve listed the top 10 nonfiction and fiction books I read in 2021. I hope you find something that piques your interest!

The 10 Best Nonfiction Books I Read in 2021

10. Inspired: Slaying Giants, Walking on Water, and Learning to Love the Bible Again — Rachel Held Evans

As the subtitle implies, Inspired is about learning to love the Bible again, and the late Rachel Held Evans brilliantly weaves together a rich tapestry of memoir, theology, history, and creative storytelling to achieve that aim. There’s a lot of books out there about the Bible, but what sets Inspired apart from that crowded field is Evan’s commitment to dive headfirst into the messy, contradictory, offensive, and head-scratching bits of Scripture most popular Christian books happily ignore and pretend don’t…

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Joe Forrest

Joe Forrest writes on the intersection of faith, culture, secularism, and politics.